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Review:

'A book which presents a highly informative account of the Arab Israeli conflict in a uniquely visual way - a book which no one interested in that conflict should miss. Ever since the Ordnance Survey rather hesitantly issues its first edition of the map of Roman Britain, and found it had (at least relatively speaking) a best-seller on its hands, the attraction of the historical map has been plain to see. With his splendid series of historical atlases, Martin Gilbert has taken this discovery a stage further: every one of them has been both engrossing in its wealth of detail and invaluable as an aid to study. And now he brings the same technique to the clarification of one of the great international problems of our time - the Arab Israeli conflict - with the same conspicuous success.' Anthony Price, Oxford Mail


Review:

'The Atlas first shows the dispersal of the Jews throughout the Mediterranean area during the Middle Ages and their subsequent expulsion from many countries: then it carefully examines the plethora of pre- and post-World War I plans for the partition of Palestine; finally, it shows the inter-war period of rapid Jewish immigration, and the wars of 1948, 1956, 1967, and 1973. 'Because the cartographic format o the book is so straightforward, readers of any level of sophistication or interest can benefit. An excellent primer.' Robert N Hills, Library Journal


Review:

'Each map includes precise explanatory data. 'A basic appendage to any analysis of Middle East history and politics.' Middle East Review


Review:

'Inset notes accompanying each map describe briefly the period and activity depicted. The notes are both accurate and informative. The legend which appears on each map assures that markings are easily understood.' Booklist, Chicago


Review:

'More than a hundred maps spell out the resultant struggle in the most graphic terms (for once, I can use 'graphic' quite literally), complemented by brief notes on incidents, and quotations from leaders of both sides. This is a very thorough history. The great advantage of presenting history through maps is the unusual clarity it brings to the most complex issues. I would recommend that anyone troubled by the conflicting caims of both sides in this bitter struggle study the book closely. Just look and you'll learn a lot, without polemics or manifestos to confuse the issue.' Alex Berlyne, Jerusalem Post Magazine


Review:

'The maps are clearly drawn and provide an excellent aide for students of the conflict, particularly in its military aspect.' British Book News


Review:

'Those whom already know Mr Gilbert's work will find the familiar factual notes included on the "map page", and he certainly manages to put over a tremendous amount of such material. An interesting attempt to make an intractable problem more intelligible. No study of this problem can ever be completely impartial, but the least to be expected is that the issues be put over as fairly as possible in a way which allows the uninformed reader to begin to appreciate the basic issues involved. This Mr Gilbert has done and the result is an interesting extension of the uses of the cartographers art.' A. Newman, Society of University Cartographers Bulletin


Review:

'Much has already been written about last year's October War in the Middle East, but no work could be more descriptive of the essential facts than The Arab-Israeli Conflict - its History in Maps, by Martin Gilbert. The author, Editor of the well-known History Atlas series, presents the complex causes of the Arab-Israeli conflict in a clear and graphic form, not only over the past twenty five years or so, but, in fact, since 1,000 B.C. Indeed, the first map shows the Jews of Palestine before the Arab Conquet 1,000 B.C. - 636 A.D. All in all, the 101 maps provide fascinating information which explains the root of the trouble better than any politician's speech. In its own way it is a masterpiece of visual history, for which the author deserves full praise.' The Diplomatist


Review:

'Professor Martin Gilbert, quite apart from his work as an historian, is on the way to earning himself the title of "map-maker extraordinary." He already had at least a dozen books of maps to his name before tackling the Arab-Israeli conflict. This collection of a hundred maps concentrates on the post-1948 period of Israel's statehood, with a fair range to cover the years following the Balfour Declaration of 1917. Technically, the maps are excellent, boldly delineated and with a wealth of information in the "boxes" skilfully used to supply it. Maps sometimes tell a story more eloquently than words; in this small book is much of the history of the ideas which went into the creation of the State of Israel, as well as the conflict which arose from the event. Some of the maps are particularly revealing. Thus, page 39 shows what the Arab response was to the announcement of the United Nations Partition Plan in November-December 1947 - at lest two dozen major Arab attacks on Jewish settlers, with very little response from the Jewish side. The facts of the Palestinian re-refugee question are dealt with - and those, too, of the exodus of Jews from Arab countries. There is a detailed study of Palestinian terrorism. "Jordan - a Base for Terror, 1968-1971" shows the vortex of Palestinian-Jordanian hatred which built up outside Israel's borders. To those who maintain how evil and intransigent Zionism has been, the map on page 37 is an answer - the Jewish Agency's partition plan of 1946 would have left Jerusalem under international control. Yet Jerusalem lay at the heart of every Jew, throughout the world. I would recommend Martin Gilbert's book of maps for compulsory study by every leader-writer in the British press today, and for those other, under-informed "pundits" who persistently display their ignorance of what has really happened in the Middle East.' Terence Prittie, Jewish Chronicle


Review:

'Apt quotations and explanatory inserts aide the understanding of this complex subject. Meticulously researched, this is a useful guide for those interested in this major issue of our times.' Scunthorpe Evening Telegraph


Review:

'An invaluable addition to current Israeliana... a lucid commentary on problems that must challenge Israel and the great powers to whom the survival and security of Eretz Israel is a sine qua non.' Glasgow Jewish Echo


Review:

'Clear and objective information on events of extraordinary complexity. The cartography in this Atlas, like the other in this series, is fine.' Geographical Magazine


Review:

'His atlas is novel in that it does not confine itself to the cartography of the Holy Land alone. Every single map is accompanied by a detailed description of the situation of Jewish settlers in Palestine at successive periods in history, the initial map showing the areas of Jewish settlement before 636 AD.' Jewish Echo


Review:

'superb and highly accessible ... (Gilbert's) eminence as one of today's great historians and biographers ... is not simply because of the astonishing volume and reach of his researcvh and writing but because of its quality and its careful marshalling of facts." i"Gilbert's Atlas is an invaluable and lucid guide to the actual facts in disputes such as these by a master of the subject. It is a volume that all Jewish families and institutions, as well as students of the Holocaust, Middle East politics and history should own.' Benjamin D. Singer - The London Jewish Community News, London, Ontario, Canada